4 Business Lessons Managers can learn from Teachers

Business Lessons from Teachers

Teaching is beyond just reciting from the textbook. It involves delivering lessons to students, which isn’t just restricted to classrooms. Great teachers make you come alive in the classroom, they inspire you, they excite you and ideally, they make you into a better version of yourself. The most effective teachers are the ones who guide their students, provide growth opportunities, instil creativity, make room for curiosity, leave labels behind, and teach with compassion. At the office, these strategies can be applied by managers who want to better their leadership skills. These practices can lead to stronger work culture, thriving relationships, and a better chance to meet financial goals. On the occasion of teacher’s day, we list down 4 business lessons managers can learn from their teachers.

Know the Learning Style of Your Team Members

The term “learning styles” means every student learns differently. Very often an individual’s learning style refers to a way in which the student absorbs, processes, and retains information. The technique in office is similar.

In our ever-evolving workplaces, employees are constantly flooded with information. One way to effectively ensure employees properly absorb all that information and put it to good use is to try and understand each team member’s personal learning style. Each individual possesses a learning style that works more effectively for them than others. Some people learn better by seeing or hearing. Others learn best with hands-on experience. Understanding the learning style of your team members can help you know which approach to take when you want them to learn and grow.

Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.

― Benjamin Franklin

Patience is Key

Students are curious – the younger they are, the more so. It is a teacher’s job to answer their questions, teach them the know-hows of the subject. The workforce in the office are very much like students in a classroom: they are curious, they want to know more about their tasks and what is expected of them. Now, it’s not necessary for you to teach them their job, but you can aid their growth and learning in a patient way. It is your job as a manager to provide answers, whether by answering the question or directing the person towards the source where the answer can be found.

Patience is the companion of wisdom. – Saint Augustine

The Value of Independence

One key quality of a good teacher is to enable a student to be an independent and confident individual. A teacher teaches her students to think analytically, know where to get information, make judgments, trust them and stand behind their actions. A manager’s role is similar, isn’t it? As managers, you supervise and offer support.

A manager is not a person who can do the work better than his men; he is a person who can get his men to do the work better than he can. — Frederick W. Smith

Be a Good Listener and Observer

Teachers are usually good at listening and observing. They know when their students are at their top performance and when they are stuck. Managers should be good at listening and observing as well. If the performance of your team member is dropping, make sure you know why. If someone is not able to finish their task before the deadline, make sure they can tell you about it. If you lend an ear and observe, your team will learn to trust you and trust is the foundation of a good team.

When the trust account is high, communication is easy, instant, and effective. — Stephen R. Covey

For so many of us, there was this one teacher who inspired us to be passionate at work. As managers, you should be just like those teachers: motivating your team members to excel at what they do and support them as they learn and grow.

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